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'Māori Weaving with Erenora Puketapu-Hetet'

$65 NZD

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The latest version (2016) of the much-loved weaving text by Erenora Puketapu-Hetet is a must have for all students of Māori weaving.

At the time Erenora wrote this book, it was one of the first written from a weaver's perspective. A valuable resource for all weaving students, Māori Weaving with Erenora Puketapu-Hetet emphasises the importance of the spiritual side of Māori weaving, which cannot be separated from the manual skills. The book includes a guide to the many plants that can be used for weaving and dyeing and step-by-step instructions for weaving a kono, a headband and two kinds of traditional plaits.

Well known in Aoetearoa New Zealand for her weaving, Erenora's work has also been exhibited widely throughout Australia, the Pacific, Europe and North America. Her concern for the future of Māori weaving, particularly the need for students to be aware of the traditional customs of this sacred art from, was her main motive in writing this text.

Erenora Puketapu-Hetet grew up in Waiwhetū amongst her tribe, Te Āti Awa, and was introduced to weaving very early on. Her husband, Rangi Hetet, is a carver. For more than four decades, until her untimely passing in 2006, Erenora taught the art of Māori weaving alongside Rangi who taught carving. Their four children, a son-in-law and some of their fourteen mokopuna are involved in various aspects of Māori art. Daughter Veranoa Hetet continues the teaching of weaving online through the Hetet School of Māori Art.

Softcover | Publisher Hetet Press | Published 2016 | Pages 116 | ISBN 9780473371296

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Erenora Puketapu-Hetet

(1941 - 2006)

Erenora was the daughter of Vera and Ihaia Puketapu. She was raised in the tribal settlement of her father’s people the Ngāti Hamua of Te Atiawa at Waiwhetu.

Rangi and Erenora courted when Rangi worked on the wharenui Arohanui ki te Tangata at Waiwhetu in the late 1950s. They were the first couple to be married in the meeting house a month after it opened.

Erenora learned taaniko weaving with her sister-in-law, Jean Puketapu and rourou from other women in her whānau as a young teenager.

At 19 and as a new member of the Hetet whānau with an obvious interest in weaving, she was taken under the wing of Rangi's grandmother, Rangimarie, who taught Erenora raranga, whatu kākahu and other weaving skills.

Erenora was renowned as both a traditional weaver and a contemporary Maori artist and was highly regarded as a teacher of weaving. Her work can be found in public and private collections throughout the world and has been exhibited widely throughout Australia, the Pacific, Europe and North America.